Habits Of Exceptional Junior Creatives

Opinion - 10th Nov 14 10:37 am - 0 Comments

Image credit: Katy Davis. When you’re starting out in the creative industry it can be hard to know what to do to get ahead, apart from working hard and having good ideas. Wouldn’t it be great to know what senior creatives look for in exceptional junior creatives? We asked three successful, industry leading senior creatives and mentors from our Vivid portfolio masterclasses, to tell us about the habits they have observed in exceptional junior creatives. Here’s what they had to say.

Jenni Doran, Senior Designer at Landor Associates

Jenni Doran Landor Associates The Loop

Enthusiasm & Passion

What a junior may lack in experience at the start of their career, they make up with an abundance of enthusiasm and passion. This becomes infectious through the whole team and this new energy becomes our fuel for long projects and late nights.

Appetite to learn

We found our Junior designer, Elle through our internship program Shine and since the day she started with us Elle has thrown herself into so many different projects video, motion, packaging, identity design. Along the way she has pushed herself to learn new skills, find solutions to execute ideas that she previously didn’t know how too. In a short few months, she has learnt an incredible amount and we have to remind ourselves that it was only a few months ago she was an intern with us. Be a sponge and absorb everything!

Listen

This sounds like an easy one but its such an important part of what we do. We have to really listen to each other, listen to creative direction, listen to clients. When a junior designer actively listens to the direction and feedback you give and you see them consciously translate that into their work – that straight away shows me that they are going to be great with clients, showing the client understanding and listening to what they want to achieve.

Bonnie Forsyth, Senior Digital Designer for M&C Saatchi & Saatchi

Bonnie Forsyth M&C Saatchi

Shortcuts

Almost every promotion and compliment I’ve received at work is because I’m the go-to person for a quick turnaround on a project. Make shortcuts your bitch.

Be Organised

Sometimes it may feel like a waste of time labelling all your photoshop layers or saving something in the right spot, but it will ensure that the next time you need to find something or make an amend, it can be quick and painless.

Fake it till you make it

Third, is kind of overused but for good reason – fake it till you make it. If there’s a cool project I wanted to work on, I pretended to know how to do what’s required and then I just sort out the details later.

Ask Questions

Lastly, remember that you’re just starting out in this industry and there’s heaps to uncover in a new job so don’t feel scared to ask lots of questions. If you go in with confidence, a willingness to learn, a strong liver and a big smile – you’ll be sorted.

Matt Jackson, Founder of Affectors

Matt Jackson Affectors

Circle of gratitude

Truly talented people celebrate other people’s talents rather than compete with them. I recognize this trait when I thank a creative for what they have done and then they thank me for the opportunity to create something then I will thank them and they will thank me and the circle of gratitude goes round and round. This always leads to a long term relationship based on mutual respect.

Set your own worth

Confident creatives with a healthy level of self esteem price their work based on their individual and unique approach to their work. They charge to solve the problem not based on an hourly rate set by the average. You are not average so don’t price your self that way.

Aspire to great depth

Individuals who are constantly asking questions, growing and experiencing new things contribute the most to our diverse industry. Following trends and aspiring to popularity by any means is superficial. Being true to your self and expressing a subject matter sincerely through your own lens based on your personal experiences creates more engaging work.

   

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